Homework!

Along with going to the zoo every day (I missed today shhhh) and setting my own assignments+exercises, I also signed up for a course at Sketchbook Skool.*

The class I signed up for had Mike Lowery and Rebecca Green as tutors, and I love them, which was basically the clincher. But it’s Vanessa Brantley-Newton, whose name I didn’t know, but whose books I have seen about the internet, that has really got into my head with useful advice. (Not that the others haven’t been great. I’m sure I’ll be back with some of their advice later. But for now: Vanessa.)

She taught herself how to illustrate for children by going to bookshops and studying up on all the books that exist. She told us about how she would dissect the way they worked, and set herself homework assignments. I felt like Anne of Green Gables finding an instant kindred spirit…

She also talked a lot about the psychological side of making art, and the importance of setting aside time to just… play with art. This is something I’ve heard other artists talk about many times before, but without any guidance whatsoever. Vanessa, however, gave a demonstration. She set herself a prompt (the word ‘ridiculous’) and collaged her way to an end result. Perhaps it was just good timing in my brain. Perhaps it was the fact that she was using collage, which I find a particularly freeing medium. Perhaps it was that she was singing one of my favourite songs as she worked. But I felt like I finally kinda understood. The point was to make something for the sake of making it. It wasn’t for anything other than herself. It wasn’t because it would hopefully lead to a big fancy project. It wasn’t going to be perfect, but it could be expressive. It could still hold meaning.

I like to solve problems and it’s generally how I approach illustration. This is useful but means that ‘playing’ always seems a little perplexing. I’ve often tried it just to end up with an unsatisfying drawing that I feel needs to be taken to my computer and worked on for several hours to get anywhere worthwhile, or I’m left with scribbly marks that have no meaning or value to me at all. Using a prompt though, and with the challenge of combining bits and pieces to cobble together the result, it really worked for me. The challenge will be to hold onto that essence when my brain wants to be ~productive~, or when I’m using a medium where I feel like I should end up with a ~better~ final result, but we’ll see. It was fun and reminded me of painting nights with friends in Adelaide. (@UnwiseOwl, yeah I’m looking at you guys).

*This is not an ad for them – I’ve also previously taken courses on Schoolism and Skillshare (what is with all the S’s?) and downloaded tutorial videos from James Gurney. If you wanna chat pros and cons and specific purposes, come talk to me in the comments. But for this specific goal, I thought a sketchbook focussed class would be ideal, and a variety of tutors would give me a bunch of different ideas, so hopefully something would stick.

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