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Missing Steps (Part 2)

Following on from yesterday, I’ve tried to break down the gaps into specific skills I can focus on learning/practising/re-learning.

Copying Accurately: Seeing and replicating the exact angles and proportions and measurements that make something what it is is pretty central to being able to take the good of a sketch and build on it in a later drawing.

Exercises:

  • Accurate observational drawing from life
  • Copy my own simple arrangements of shapes
  • Memory drawing exercises (look, cover, draw, check etc)

Refining a Composition: Taking a basic idea and testing out various compositions to find an arrangement that works well is the only way I’m going to make illustrations I really like. In a workflow I’ll want to draw lots of tiny thumbnails of the one idea – changing one aspect at a time. Hopefully these exercises will help my brain to do that without panicking.

Exercises:

  • Draw an object/still life from a different viewpoint than the one I’m looking at. (Simplify: Draw it twice, changing viewpoint in between)
  • Draw an object/still life with different lighting (and hence shadows) than reality. (Simplify: Draw it twice, changing the lighting in between.)
  • Draw a still life. Then redraw a more pleasing arrangement of those objects, without rearranging the physical objects.
  • Draw a rough sketch of an imagined interior, or other angular setting. Fix the perspective, and redraw basically but accurately.

Refining Details and Adding Information: The final stage is to add details, and make things feel right and complete, without losing any of the energy of the previous steps. Accurate copying should help with this step. But there’s also the fact that at this, the most precise step, I often use the undo button when working digitally. I need to practise being deliberate.

Exercises:

  • Draw a rough sketch of anything simple (animal, plant, prop, hand) and then refine/stylise using reference or memory, without losing overall shape.
  • Draw a composition of broad shapes. Turn into 3 different scenes by changing the details/objects.
  • Design a character. Roughly sketch different expressions/poses and refine each into the designed character.

There’s a lot to do here. I probably won’t even end up doing all of these exercises, but I hope they’ll start my brain and hands moving in the right direction.

Missing Steps

That’s the usual state of affairs. See the other pictures for this story here.

Research: First I research and read the context: in this case a piece about Nikola Tesla and his cat, so I spent some time sketching Tesla, and cats.

Ideas: Then I come up with a bunch of scribbly ideas. Usually, but not always, in my sketchbook.

Rough Sketches: After that I take a few of my ideas and turn them into rough sketches digitally. I check any large important research, like period appropriate buildings or the layout of a ship. I make sure I’m using the right dimensions and determine the rough final composition. In this case it was as simple as adding a shelf and lamp to the background of the picture, but sometimes I might change the viewing angle a lot, or add a foreground element or something. By the end of this step, all the big pieces are in place.

Underdrawing: This is when I zoom in on all the pieces of the puzzle and make them work. I fix the anatomy and character consistency. I make sure the clothing is right. I add smaller details – particularly in larger and more complex illustrations. For this one I make sure the style of lamp is period appropriate and worry about the cat’s expression, and the placement of buttons. I’ll usually do a colour sketch too, though I haven’t here.

Final Illustration: Most of the thinking is done, but there are subtleties of texture, expression, and colour to tend to here. I have a lot of fun adding shadows and highlights, and generally less fun just blocking in colours. And then ta da! It’s done!

For this art study time, I wanted to take this whole process traditional. And I was really focussed on the Final Illustration stage, because of course that’s where the real difference comes in. But I’ve realised that I need to start much earlier. It turns out that I’m having a lot of trouble developing my composition on paper, without the digital tools of cut, paste, scale, rotate, etc. It turns out that I’m having a lot of trouble developing my underdrawing, without the ability to redraw a more refined version directly over a rough version. It turns out I’m having trouble with the drawing, full stop.

There are two main directions I could go from that realisation:

  1. Continue to develop my underdrawings digitally, but otherwise continue as planned, working with traditional media for the final step only.
  2. Switch my learning focus to the earlier stage of refining my drawing traditionally, and don’t worry about the final step in the process yet.
  3. (Bonus: Give up and go back to digital art altogether.)

To me, the second option seems the more fundamental and useful skill, so that’s what I’m going to put my focus for the time being. More on the specifics of that in a future post 🙂

Zoo Trips – Week 1

Even before I knew I was doing for the rest of Blaugust, I already had one plan in place: to visit the zoo every (week)day.

I narrowed in on lemurs as my main sketching subject because there are lots of them and they’re usually easy to see. One week in and I now have pages and pages of lemur sketches, from which I’ve pulled out just a few to share here.

The main purpose of the project was simply to get used to having my sketchbook out, and to use it more often. It has already been a complete success. I also sketched while out and about on the weekend and in a lull while volunteering today (for the Melbourne Writers Festival).

My focus for the next week is to really watch the lemurs and then sketch my impressions of them. Less direct observational drawing and more short term memory of specific poses or personalities.

After that, maybe I’ll focus on particular anatomy: how do their hands and feet work, perhaps. We’ll see. It’s been really nice, anyway. I think I’m just gonna wanna visit the zoo every day forever.

A 30 Day Project

Earlier in the year, I did a month-long evening drawing project. It could, perhaps, be seen as a precursor to this project, so I want to share it.

Task: draw people from reference photos.* Materials: brown paper and coloured pencils. Successfully completed daily: yes.

After a rocky start, I realised a few things.

  1. I needed to limit my palette. The colours were overwhelming. Once I realised that, I chose a limited selection of pencils at the start of the drawing (based on the main colours in the reference photo), and used only those. It made everything easier and more fun. Also it looked better.
  2. The material I was using was important. There was no point using coloured pencils as if they were paint – I was better off enjoying them for what they were. This led to me leaving much more of the paper blank, actually using pencil textures, and creating more interesting illustrations.

After these realisations it was fairly smooth sailing. I had pictures I liked and pictures I hated, but overall I was learning. And that was the main thing.

*I created a selection of pictures before starting and just worked my way through them in order. Taking away my choice of subject and material was a really useful technique that helped me actually sit down and do the work. Credit to Roz Stendahl for the idea. I really recommend her blog posts on projects and goal setting and the internal critic if you want to get better at something (anything) but struggle to stick at it.

Happy Blaugust!

It’s Blaugust again. I am already nearly a week deep in an artistic development project, of a slightly different sort than last year. It’s inspired by last year, but far more practical and hands on. I am learning to create illustrations traditionally. That is, with paints, pencils, collage, etc. And no computer.

It’s something I’ve made a few attempts at throughout the last year, but each time I’ve given up thinking I want this picture to look good and I know I can make it look better on the computer so I’m gonna just do that. This time is different because, well, these illustrations aren’t for anything in particular. They will be what they will be, even though that likely means they won’t fit into my portfolio.

This time is also different because I’ve set myself a bunch of very specific activities, assignments and tasks to hopefully break it all down. I’ve unfortunately already realised I might need to change/add some tasks, but we can talk about that another day.

Along with recording and analysing my progress, I’ll also use these Blaugust posts to talk about what I’ve been up to in the last year, and probably to dissect some cool artists I like.

Bye friends, see you tomorrow 🙂

A Lesson from KidLitVic 2019

I missed out on the Illustrator Showcase this year, and I was super disappointed about it. But missing out meant I felt more compelled to get a Portfolio Assessment, and that was the best decision I could have made.

I’ve spent most of the last year in a kind of hibernation. I was focussed on moving my art in directions I’m happy with, telling stories I want to tell, and developing techniques without too much outside influence. I think that was a good decision, and will be incredibly helpful moving forward. But I did also need a reminder to move forward, and the advice Susannah Chambers (of Allen & Unwin) gave me really helped me realise that.

In short, I had been so focussed on the stories that I personally want to tell, that I had forgotten the practical side of things. Form with no function, as it were. So, while my dream project may be to do full page illustrations for a weird collection of middle grade sci fi poetry… there aren’t that many projects like that floating around. And it’s not like it’s the only thing I’m interested in.

Specifically, Susannah pointed out that usually, as a junior/middle-grade illustrator, you don’t often get the luxury of full pages to work with. And if that’s all that’s in my portfolio, then it can seem like I’m either not interested in making the kind of illustrations they need, or that I can’t.

To turn all of this into another field: I love wearing short denim shorts. I would be happy wearing them every single day. Except that obviously I can’t or I would be cold and miserable. And there are tons of winter clothes I love wearing too, so it’s all good. But my portfolio shouldn’t just be filled with denim shorts or no one will ever hire me to wear bootcut jeans and cute sweaters. Yeah?

That is to say, I need to survey where I’m at right now, and find where it intersects with illustrations that people want, and then show them that I can do that (and want to!) by posting about it on the internet. Publishers are busy people, making books is risky, and they need to know I’m up for the project.

And also, separately, I need to continue my development work in a safe space free of outside influences, so I can look across at that and use it as a guide to stop me accidentally buying skinny jeans when I know I hate wearing them. But that’s for another post.

Goldie Roth

Goldie_Final_flat_3

This piece is fan art of Lian Tanner’s Museum of Thieves. Goldie, the main character, is just about to venture forth into her new life as a runaway. She’s a determined kid, but she’s just spent all day crying, and is alone for the first time in her life.

goldie thumbs

I really wanted to capture the city as an imposing secondary character, and to include the Great Hall as an obvious focal point, looming over the scene. I settled on a close-up view of Goldie, so I could show her expression, and the (plot-relevant) ribbon around her wrist.

Stylistically, I tried to call on middle-grade illustrations I love. From Helquist to Riddell, I find there’s a common thread of stylised but rendered. That is, things don’t necessarily need to be fully realistic, but they should have a sense of solidity, of depth and detail. You want to feel that the world continues beyond the pictures. 

Goldie at Docks2

From there, I collaged the picture together – painting and drawing bits and pieces, scanning them in, and layering them up. I’ve been trying really hard to bring my ‘sketchbook style’ into complex finished pictures, and collaging is what’s working best at present. The scan below is what I used as a guideline for various elements. Other parts of the picture (like Goldie herself) were drawn almost entirely digitally. And, yes, that hair was super fun to draw.

final_drawing_web.jpg

For fun, and because I’ve been told I really need to show I can work in vignettes (more on that in a later post!), here’s a quick alternate version with just Goldie and the boat:

Goldie_whitebg.jpg

Have a nice Sunday, friends, and expect some more blogging sometime soon 🙂